‘Intrepid’ Suspends Production

Main article: Axanar Tries to Rally Fan Films to Its Proposed Guidelines
See also: The Public Interest Behind Private Guidelines Talks and Backlash.

The long-running Scotland-based fan film, Star Trek: Intrepid, suspended production June 2, 2016, citing the Axanar lawsuit “and the uncertainty about what the rumoured fanfilm guidelines will entail.”

This brings the toll of suspended fan productions to three in the wake of the Axanar lawsuit, including Star Trek: Constellation and Federation Rising, the sequel to Star Trek–Horizon.

Producer Nick Cook said his decision came “in light of the ongoing lawsuit between CBS/Paramount and Axanar, and the uncertainty about what the rumoured fanfilm guidelines will entail.”

Public Statement

In a post on the production’s Facebook page, producer Nick Cook said:

« We have nothing but gratitude towards CBS and Paramount for allowing us and others to play in their sandbox for so long and that gratitude, not to mention our respect, will endure. » — Intrepid producer Nick Cook

It seems increasingly unwise to me to invest any further resources in such projects until we know if they can be produced under whatever guidelines the license holder deems necessary.1)

Cook was one of the people invited by Axanar producer Alec Peters to support guidelines he wanted to negotiate with CBS and Paramount as part of talks to settle their copyright infringement lawsuit against him.

When their discussions came to light, however, Cook and almost all other fan productions disavowed Peters’ effort.

In the meantime, Cook said the production will complete episodes already “in the can (or mostly so).”

STAR TREK: INTREPID was one of the longest-running fan productions, begun in 2003. Pictured: Producer, writer and star Nick Cook (left) and co-star Michael Cugley. Website »

Cook said the move did not come from “any animosity towards CBS or Paramount. We have always respected their ownership of Star Trek, and their long-standing kindness towards fan works. They have every right to use their properties as they see fit, and to restrict unauthorised uses whenever and however they choose.”

He also expressed to CBS and Paramount the production’s “gratitude, not to mention our respect.”

Intrepid’s suspension follows a similar April 29, 2016, announcement by Star Trek: Constellation, which was in preproduction.2)

Fans' Reaction

Fan reaction on Intrepid’s Facebook page was sympathetic.

“Man, I hate this,” said Rob Roberson. “Yours is easily the best of the fan productions. I remember the salad days where you guys hadn’t sorted out the audio yet…and the story was so good I still sat through it (with speakers maxed out) because I wanted to see how things ended. That was some damn fine writing! I hope this gets sorted out sooner then later. I really will miss Star Trek: Intrepid.”3)

“Intrepid has had a great innings and I’d imagine that this was such a hard decision to take,” fan Glenn Harrison wrote. “I hope it’s a rest rather than an ending, but either way you can all move on to something new with your heads held high.”4)

In other Facebook groups, the reaction was more hostile toward Axanar:

“I wish [Nick Cook] the best, and hopefully he can continue doing what he loves in the future,” wrote Scott Carlson in the CBS/Paramount vs. Axanar Facebook group. “It is upsetting that the ones playing the most by the ‘unwritten’ rules are the ones that are being hurt the worst. They have pure passion for an idea and are willing to make sure everything is on the level. Then some greedy fool comes in, ruins it for everyone, then decides to set up his own rules.” 5)

About ‘Intrepid’

Star Trek: Intrepid has been in production for 13 years, producing almost a dozen episodes, some in collaboration with the long-running Star Trek: Hidden Frontier. Based in Dundee, Scotland, Intrepid was one of the few British fan productions.

Intrepid's Latest Episode

Intrepid’s episodes can be accessed from the Star Trek: Intrepid website or their YouTube page.


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